free login william hill app not working_free login william hill burning desire_Welfare offer william hill district manager https://www.google.com//fbe/ Celebrating Films of the 1960s & 1970s en Serendipity 1.5.2 - http://www.s9y.org/ Mon, 06 Feb 2017 03:27:55 GMT /fbe/templates/default/img/s9y_banner_small.png RSS: Cinema Retro - Tom Lisanti - Celebrating Films of the 1960s & 1970s https://www.google.com//fbe/ 100 21 "FEMME FATALES: WOMEN IN ESPIONAGE FILMS & TELEVISION, 1962-1973" BY TOM LISANTI AND LOUIS PAUL, REVISED AND UPDATED EDITION NOW AVAILABLE https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/9530-FEMME-FATALES-WOMEN-IN-ESPIONAGE-FILMS-TELEVISION,-1962-1973-BY-TOM-LISANTI-AND-LOUIS-PAUL,-REVISED-AND-UPDATED-EDITION-NOW-AVAILABLE.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/9530-FEMME-FATALES-WOMEN-IN-ESPIONAGE-FILMS-TELEVISION,-1962-1973-BY-TOM-LISANTI-AND-LOUIS-PAUL,-REVISED-AND-UPDATED-EDITION-NOW-AVAILABLE.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=9530 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=9530 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p><!-- s9ymdb:8900 --><img class="serendipity_image_center" width="450" height="633" src="/fbe/uploads/femmefatales.jpg" /> </p> <p>Cinema Retro columnist <strong>Tom Lisanti</strong> co-authored (with Louis Paul) the book &quot;Femme Fatales: Women in Espionage Films and Television, 1962-1973&quot; for McFarland publishers. The book has just been issued in a softcover edition, revised and updated. Here is Tom Lisanti's story behind the creation of the book.&#160;</p> <p><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">It was a long time coming, fifteen years in fact, but McFarland and Company finally released a soft cover edition of the very popular and well-received </span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">Film Fatales: Women in Espionage Film &amp; Television, 1962-1973</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;"> by Louis Paul and myself. The book profiles 107 dazzling women (Ursula Andress, Raquel Welch, Dahlia Lavi, Carol Lynley, Elke Sommer, and Sharon Tate, among them) who worked in the swinging sixties spy genre on the big and small screens. Some include interviews with these sexy spy gals. This new edition contains some profile revisions and updates and a few new photos.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">The idea for this book was all Louis Paul¡¯s. We worked together at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and became friends. Louis is an expert on European spy movies, giallos, thrillers, etc. from the sixties and seventies. He had a side video business and produced a fanzine called&#160;</span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">Blood Times</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">. I had been interviewing sixties actresses for magazine articles and culled them for a book that was called&#160;</span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">Fantasy Femmes of Sixties Cinema</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">. While I was finishing it up, Louis suggested we do a book on sixties spy girls. There were books on just the Bond Girls but we thought we'd go beyond that to also include actresses from the Matt Helm, Derek Flint, and Euro spy movies. And we also decided to include actresses who worked in TV spy shows like&#160;</span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">The Man from</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;"> </span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">U.N.C.L.E.</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">,&#160;</span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">I Spy</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">,&#160;</span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">The Avengers</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">,&#160;</span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">It Takes a Thief</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">&#160;, etc. At the last minute I pulled quotes from some of my interviewees on their spy films/TV shows destined for my first book and saved for </span><em style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">Film Fatales</em><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9.5pt;">.</span></p> <p> </p> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_center" style="width: 450px;"> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_img"><!-- s9ymdb:8901 --><img class="serendipity_image_center" width="450" height="328" src="/fbe/uploads/ONESPYDONNAMICHELETUB.jpg" /></div> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_txt">Robert Vaughn and Donna Michelle in the Man From U.N.C.L.E. feature film &quot;One Spy Too Many&quot; (1966). </div> </div> <p>&#160;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; color: #222222;"> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="color: #222222; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 12.6667px;">We felt that the book would reach a nice size audience because spy films have remained so popular due to James Bond. It is 2017 and they still are making Bond movies. It seems never ending and moviegoers just love the escapism. The affection for the 1960s Bond movies extends to the copycat films (Matt Helm, Derek Flint, Harry Palmer, Diabolik, etc.) and TV shows of the day. They all employed handsome debonair leading men, adventure, romance, diabolical villains, picturesque scenery, and some of the most beautiful actresses from Hollywood and Europe. The spy girls in particular remained popular because this genre gave them different type characters to play. A number of the actresses are exceptional and in some cases their characters are more memorable than the hero. In the book the roles are broken down into four distinct types: the helpful spy/secret agent/operative; the innocent caught up in the chicanery; the bad girl-turned-good; and the unrepentant villainess/femme fatale/assassin. This is why fans love their spy girls because of the varied facets found in this genre.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; color: #222222;"> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%; background: white;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; color: #222222;"> </span></p> <br /><a href="/fbe/index.php?/archives/9530-FEMME-FATALES-WOMEN-IN-ESPIONAGE-FILMS-TELEVISION,-1962-1973-BY-TOM-LISANTI-AND-LOUIS-PAUL,-REVISED-AND-UPDATED-EDITION-NOW-AVAILABLE.html#extended">Continue reading "&quot;FEMME FATALES: WOMEN IN ESPIONAGE FILMS &amp; TELEVISION, 1962-1973&quot; BY TOM LISANTI AND LOUIS PAUL, REVISED AND UPDATED EDITION NOW AVAILABLE "</a> Mon, 06 Feb 2017 14:04:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/9530-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ AUTHOR TOM LISANTI ON "PAMELA TIFFIN: HOLLYWOOD TO ROME, 1961-1974" https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/9240-AUTHOR-TOM-LISANTI-ON-PAMELA-TIFFIN-HOLLYWOOD-TO-ROME,-1961-1974.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/9240-AUTHOR-TOM-LISANTI-ON-PAMELA-TIFFIN-HOLLYWOOD-TO-ROME,-1961-1974.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=9240 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=9240 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p><!-- s9ymdb:8558 --><img class="serendipity_image_center" width="450" height="643" src="/fbe/uploads/PAMELATIFFINBOOK.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>BY TOM LISANTI&#160;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -2.7pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">My new book <em>Pamela Tiffin: Hollywood to Rome, 1961-1974</em>&#160;(McFarland) was recently released and I keep getting asked the same question. Why a book on Pamela Tiffin? I expected this from non-Sixties cinema fans but have been getting asked by more fans and experts on the time period as well. So to answer why a book on Pamela Tiffin? She is one of that decade¡¯s most beautiful and talented actresses who left an indelible impression on movie fans. For me, she is prettier than Raquel Welch; funnier than Jane Fonda; and more appealing than Ann-Margret. Yet, they all became superstars and Pamela did not. My book tries to explain why I think Pamela Tiffin, gifted with expert comedic ability, did not achieve mega stardom though she remains a cult Sixties pop icon to this day.<o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -2.7pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -2.7pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">I first saw Pamela Tiffin in the colorful travelogue <em>The Pleasure Seekers</em>, which was broadcast on the <em>ABC-TV 4:30 Movie</em> sometime in the mid-Seventies. By then I was a huge Carol Lynley fan due to <em>The Poseidon Adventure</em> and would seek out her other movie appearances. I had heard of co-star Ann-Margret but was not familiar with the handsome brunette Pamela Tiffin, the third member of this romance-seeking trio. I recall not being impressed with Ann-Margret in the least, though I thought she did swell performing the title song. I do love Carol Lynley in this movie, but I found myself beguiled by Pamela. She took what was the typical sweet na?ve ing¨¦nue role and made it funny, touching, and sexy. I was only thirteen years old or so at the time and even at that young age I knew Pamela had a certain something the other two actresses did not. Soon after, I began seeking Pamela¡¯s movies out and the <em>4:30 Movie</em> came through with <em>For Those Who Think Young </em>and <em>The Lively Set</em>. I was hooked and could not understand why she was not as a big of star as Ann-Margret or even Carol Lynley. <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -2.7pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -2.7pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">I began researching Pamela Tiffin¡¯s career in my local Long Island library to discover that she practically disappeared from the silver screen after 1966 with a few Italian movies popping up thereafter. My determination to uncover all about Pamela Tiffin culminated when I interviewed her at her New York City home for a series of short magazine articles and a chapter in my first book in 1998. She was elegant and charming with that same whispery voice. We stayed in contact for a brief period, but then I stopped hearing from her, though my devotion to her never ceased. <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: 1.8pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: 1.8pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Pamela Tiffin once described her entr¨¦e into Hollywood ¡°as a kind of Cinderella story.¡±<span class="MsoEndnoteReference"> </span>And it truly was. A model and cover girl, she was discovered while on vacation having lunch at the Paramount Studios commissary. She won critical raves for her performances in her first two films <em>Summer and Smoke</em> (1961) and the Billy Wilder comedy <em>One, Two, Three</em> (1961) giving a wonderfully amusing performance as an addled-brain Southern belle who sneaks into East Berlin and marries a Communist to the chagrin of her guardian in Germany. Everyone from James Cagney to Billy Wilder to Jose Ferrer praised her acting ability, especially her forte with comedy. <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: 1.8pt; line-height: 200%;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -4.3pt; line-height: 200%;"><br /></p> <br /><a href="/fbe/index.php?/archives/9240-AUTHOR-TOM-LISANTI-ON-PAMELA-TIFFIN-HOLLYWOOD-TO-ROME,-1961-1974.html#extended">Continue reading "AUTHOR TOM LISANTI ON &quot;PAMELA TIFFIN: HOLLYWOOD TO ROME, 1961-1974&quot;"</a> Thu, 23 Jun 2016 10:40:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/9240-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ GAIL GERBER, ¡®60s ELVIS AND BEACH MOVIE STARLET, DEAD AT AGE 76 https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/7954-GAIL-GERBER,-60s-ELVIS-AND-BEACH-MOVIE-STARLET,-DEAD-AT-AGE-76.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/7954-GAIL-GERBER,-60s-ELVIS-AND-BEACH-MOVIE-STARLET,-DEAD-AT-AGE-76.html#comments 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<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" Name="Bibliography"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading"/> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /<strong> Style Definitions </strong>/ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} </style> <![endif]--> </p> <p style="line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%; font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">Gail Gerber passed away on March 2, 2014 due to complications from lung cancer. Gerber was born on October 4, 1937 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and began studying ballet at age seven. Extremely talented, at fifteen she became the youngest member of Les Grandes Ballets Canadiennes in Montreal. Quitting the ballet troupe in the late 1950s and abandoning a husband who was a jazz musician, she moved to Toronto to work as an actress. She appeared on stage and in many live CBC television dramas. As part of the act of legendary vaudeville entertainers Smith and Dale (who were the basis for <em>The Sunshine Boys</em>), she appeared on <em>The Wayne and Schuster Show</em> and <em>The Ed Sullivan Show</em>. Moving to Hollywood in 1963, the talented blonde with a flair for comedy quickly snagged the lead role in the play <em>Under the Yum Yum Tree</em> and appeared on such popular TV series as <em>My Three Sons</em>, <em>Perry Mason</em>, and <em>Wagon Train</em>. She made her film debut in <em>The Girls on the Beach</em> (1965) co-starring The Beach Boys before her agent suggested she change her name and, as Gail Gilmore, she went on to appear opposite Elvis Presley in <em>Girl Happy</em> (1965) and <em>Harum Scarum</em> (1965). She then returned to the sands of Malibu to co-star with Edd ¡°Kookie¡± Byrnes in <em>Beach Ball</em> (1965) before growing to gigantic proportions along with five other delinquent teenagers, including Beau Bridges and Tisha Sterling, who terrorize a town in <em>Village of the Giants</em> (1965). Gerber had a minor role as a cosmetician in <em>The Loved One</em>, directed by Academy Award winner Tony Richardson, and that is where she met its screenwriter <a title="Terry Southern" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Southern"><span style="color: windowtext; text-decoration: none;">Terry Southern</span></a> who was riding high due to the success of his satirical novels <em>Candy</em> and <em>The Magic Christian</em> and the movie <em>Dr. Strangelove</em> for which he co-wrote the script. The two hit it off immediately and, despite their marriages to others, became inseparable. Gail even abandoned her acting career in 1966 to live with him in New York then Connecticut where she remained his longtime companion until his death thirty years later. <span> </span>During that time she taught ballet for over twenty five years. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%; font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;"> <!-- s9ymdb:3012 --> </span></p> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_center" style="width: 360px;"> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_img"><!-- s9ymdb:4097 --><img width="360" height="480" class="serendipity_image_center" src="/fbe/uploads/LISANTIAWARD2.jpg" /></div> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_txt">Gail Gerber and Cinema Retro columnist Tom Lisanti at the Independent Publishers Book Award ceremonies in 2011.</div> </div><br /> <p>&#160;</p> <p style="line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%; font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">After Southern¡¯s death in 1995, Gail spent most of her time living in New York City. During the last twenty years of her life, she was the secretary of the Terry Southern Trust and returned to acting playing a dotty old woman in the independent film <em>Lucky Days</em> (2008) directed, written, and starring her friend Angelica Page Torn; and played a Wake Guest in avant-garde filmmaker Matthew Barney¡¯s just completed film <em>River of Fundament </em>(2014). She also, with myself, wrote her memoir, <em>Trippin¡¯ with Terry Southern: What I Think I Remember </em>(from publisher McFarland and Company, Inc.) where she detailed what life was like with ¡°the hippest guy on the planet,¡± as they traveled from LA to New York to Europe and back again.&#160;Gerber revealed what went on behind the scenes of her movies and Southern¡¯s including <em>The Cincinnati Kid, End of the Road</em>, and, most infamously, <em>Easy Rider</em>.&#160;And she relived the ¡°highs¡± hanging out with The Rolling Stones, Peter Sellers, Lenny Bruce, Roger Vadim and Jane Fonda, William Burroughs, Rip Torn and Geraldine Page, George Segal, Ringo Starr to the lows barely scraping by on a Berkshires farm during the 1970s &amp; 1980s. The book received a Independent Publishers Book Award Silver Medal for Best Autobiography/Memoir of 2011.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%; font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;"> </span></p> <p> </p> Tue, 04 Mar 2014 02:24:34 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/7954-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ TOM LISANTI PAYS TRIBUTE TO "VILLAGE OF THE GIANTS" (1965) https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/6335-TOM-LISANTI-PAYS-TRIBUTE-TO-VILLAGE-OF-THE-GIANTS-1965.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/6335-TOM-LISANTI-PAYS-TRIBUTE-TO-VILLAGE-OF-THE-GIANTS-1965.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=6335 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=6335 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p> </p> <p><!-- s9ymdb:5385 --><img width="369" height="300" src="/fbe/uploads/VILLAGEOFGIANTS.jpg" class="serendipity_image_center" /> </p> <p>On his web blog <em>Sixties Cinema, </em>Cinema Retro columnist Tom Lisanti pays tribute to schlock producer Bert Gordon's 1965 teenbopper exploitation flick <em>Village of the Giants, </em>featuring such cult stars as Tisha Sterling, Joy Harmon, Vicki London and Tony Basil. <a href="http://sixtiescinema.com/2011/11/05/more-top10-sixties-starlet-movies-village-of-the-giants/">Click here</a> for the story behind the film as well as original TV ads. </p> Sat, 04 May 2013 10:36:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/6335-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ DVD REVIEW: "MY BLOOD RUNS COLD" (1964) STARRING TROY DONOHUE AND JOEY HEATHERTON; WARNER ARCHIVE DVD https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/6909-DVD-REVIEW-MY-BLOOD-RUNS-COLD-1964-STARRING-TROY-DONOHUE-AND-JOEY-HEATHERTON;-WARNER-ARCHIVE-DVD.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/6909-DVD-REVIEW-MY-BLOOD-RUNS-COLD-1964-STARRING-TROY-DONOHUE-AND-JOEY-HEATHERTON;-WARNER-ARCHIVE-DVD.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=6909 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=6909 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p><!-- s9ymdb:5881 --><img class="serendipity_image_center" width="353" height="500" src="/fbe/uploads/myblood.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong><font face="verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif">By Tom Lisanti</font></strong></p> <p> <font face="verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height: 200%;">I admit it. I am a Troy Donahue fan. There I said it. Not surprising since I love and have been writing about Sixties starlets for over ten years. If there ever was a male version of a starlet, it was Troy. I purchased the DVD box set Warner Bros. Romance Classics Collection featuring four of his early Sixties movies and recently viewed&#160;</span><em style="line-height: 200%;">My Blood Runs Cold</em><span style="line-height: 200%;"> (1964) from Warner Bros Archive as a DVD-on-Demand. The pairing of Troy Donahue as a loon and Joey Heatherton as the blonde he desires in this suspense film didn¡¯t burn up the silver screens across the country and left most critics cold, but the coupling of America¡¯s favorite bland blonde boy with the Ann-Margret wannabe made for bad cinema you just got to love.</span></font></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"><font face="verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif">By 1964 Troy Donahue had reached super stardom and was one of the most popular young actors at the time, but he was extremely unhappy with the roles being offered him. He could be lackluster at times and was by no means a great actor, but with his looks Troy didn¡¯t have to be, as his boy-next-door charisma made teenage girls (and some men) swoon. His film career began in 1957 with small roles in a number of films including <em>Man of a Thousand Faces</em> (1957), <em>Summer Love</em> (19580, <em>Live Fast, Die Young </em>(1958), and <em>Monster on the Campus</em> (1958) before he was cast opposite Sandra Dee as tortured na?ve young lovers in <em>A Summer Place </em>(1959) for Warner Bros. The film, beautifully filmed off the coast of Carmel, California doubling for Maine and featuring a lush score by Max Steiner, was a huge hit especially with the teenage set. The studio wisely then signed Donahue (who shared the Golden Globe for Most Promising Newcomer ¨C Male for his performance) to a contract. He then co-starred on the lightweight TV detective series <em>Surfside 6</em> (1960-62) in between essaying the romantic leading man in a series of glossy romances (most directed by Delmer Daves) opposite some of the prettiest starlets of the day.</font></p> <p><font face="verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif"> <span style="font-size: 12.6667px;">In&#160;</span><em style="font-size: 12.6667px;">Parrish</em><span style="font-size: 12.6667px;">&#160;(1961) he is a tobacco farmer and was described as being ¡°more than a boy.&#160; He was not yet a man¡ªdangerously in-between¡­and between three girls!¡± They were Connie Stevens as an easy farm gal, Diane McBain as a bitchy gold digger, and Sharon Hugueny as a sweet rich girl. In&#160;</span><em style="font-size: 12.6667px;">Susan Slade</em><span style="font-size: 12.6667px;">&#160;(1961) he is a struggling writer in love with Connie Stevens who harbors a dreadful secret (her little brother is actually her illegitimate son!) and doesn¡¯t think she deserves happiness. Donahue won the Photoplay Gold Medal Award for Most Popular Male Actor of 1961 and continued his streak of glossy romantic dramas with the lush travelogue&#160;</span><em style="font-size: 12.6667px;">Rome Adventure</em><span style="font-size: 12.6667px;">&#160;(1962) as a grad student who falls for librarian Suzanne Pleshette (whom he was married to for a short time) though he is involved with worldly older woman Angie Dickinson. He played yet another college student in&#160;</span><em style="font-size: 12.6667px;">Palm Springs Weekend</em><span style="font-size: 12.6667px;">&#160;(1963) who on Spring Break has a fling with local gal Stefanie Powers. Then there was &#160;a change of pace role as a cavalry officer in the Raoul Walsh directed western</span><em style="font-size: 12.6667px;">A Distant Trumpet</em><span style="font-size: 12.6667px;">&#160;(1964), but to keep his teenage girls fans happy he is torn between widow Suzanne Pleshette and snooty Easterner Diane McBain.</span></font></p><font face="verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif"> </font> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 200%;"><br /></p> <br /><a href="/fbe/index.php?/archives/6909-DVD-REVIEW-MY-BLOOD-RUNS-COLD-1964-STARRING-TROY-DONOHUE-AND-JOEY-HEATHERTON;-WARNER-ARCHIVE-DVD.html#extended">Continue reading "DVD REVIEW: &quot;MY BLOOD RUNS COLD&quot; (1964) STARRING TROY DONOHUE AND JOEY HEATHERTON; WARNER ARCHIVE DVD"</a> Tue, 24 Jul 2012 22:50:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/6909-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ BOOK REVIEW: "STEVE MCQUEEN: THE ACTOR AND HIS FILMS" 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gte mso 10]> <style> /<strong> Style Definitions </strong>/ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--> <p><!-- s9ymdb:5465 --><img width="341" height="400" class="serendipity_image_center" src="/fbe/uploads/mcqueenactor.jpg" /> </p> <p><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><strong>By Tom Lisanti <br /></strong></font></p> <p align="left" class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -4.5pt; text-indent: 0.5in; line-height: 200%; direction: rtl;"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><strong><em><span style="font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films</span></em></strong><span style="font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;"> by Andrew Antonaides and Mike Siegel from Dalton Watson Fine Books is one of the finest, most lavish movie books about a single actor that I have ever read. All of iconic superstar Steve McQueen¡¯s films are equally discussed from his classics (<em>The Blob, The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, The Cincinnati Kid, The Sand Pebbles, Bullitt, The Thomas Crown Affair, Papillon</em>), to his lesser known earlier movies (<em>Never Love a Stranger, The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery</em>)<em>An Enemy of the People, The Hunter</em>), to his misfires (<em>The Honeymoon Machine, Soldier in the Rain, Baby the Rain Must Fall</em>), to his TV series (<em>Wanted: Dead or Alive</em>). Most coffee table-type movie books that I have encountered are extravagantly- made, featuring glorious photographs, but containing very little substance. However, <strong><em>Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films</em></strong> is not only handsomely produced, featuring over 1,000 rare B&amp;W and color photographs, but also contains an in-depth analysis of all of McQueen¡¯s movies listed chronologically. This does not mean McQueen¡¯s life story is ignored. The writers expertly weave in the actor¡¯s journey into each chapter. Reading about his childhood clarifies his actions and behavior as an adult, such as his legendary insecurities and his determination not to bested by anyone particularly a co-star. Each film is allocated one chapter featuring a plot summary; a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the movie (often with comments from cast or crew); the reaction of critics and the audience to the final product; and an analysis of the movie itself and McQueen¡¯s performance. All of this is accompanied by rare photos and a plethora of international color posters/lobby cards. Considering how much effort and expense went into the making of this book, you might&#160; expect it to be nothing but a paean to the actor no matter what the merits of a specific movie. Not here. I commend the writers for taking an honest and balanced approach in commenting on McQueen¡¯s choices and his performances.</span></font></p> <p align="left" class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -4.5pt; text-indent: 0.5in; line-height: 200%; direction: rtl;"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">As a film historian myself, my favorite part of the book is the backstory for each of the movies. The King of Cool on screen was not so beloved by many of his co-stars or directors off-screen. It is interesting to read about the tricks McQueen employed to upstage agitated movie star Yul Brynner on the set of <em>The Magnificent Seven</em>. Similarly, on <em>Soldier in the Rain</em> McQueen, somewhat immaturely, took out his frustrations on Jackie Gleason and director Ralph Nelson when his choice to direct the movie, Blake Edwards, walked just before filming began. The authors are correct to take him to task for his behavior here and on other movie sets. They rightly point out he was miscast as <em>Soldier in the Rain</em>¡¯s loser G.I., delivering a performance that was ¡°another oddity and one of the worst misfires of his career.¡± Indeed, it's McQueen¡¯s awkward performance that drags co-star Jackie Gleason down. Sans McQueen on screen, Gleason is wonderful as evidenced in his scenes with the sparkling Tuesday Weld as his dumb blond blind date, who has some surprising insights to the world. <br /></span></font></p> <p align="left" class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -4.5pt; text-indent: 0.5in; line-height: 200%; direction: rtl;"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">Each chapter of this book is wonderful in its own way. The standout chapters for me are those pertaining to <em>The Sand Pebbles</em> and <em>Papillon</em>, one of my favorite movies of all-time. The authors fairly give equal credit to the success of these films both <span> </span>to McQueen and their directors/writers. <span> </span>Thus, I was surprised that in their analysis of <span> </span><em>The Cincinnati Kid</em>, the authors give director Norman Jewison most of the credit for its success and didn¡¯t even mention screenwriter Terry Southern who took Ring Lardner, Jr.¡¯s original script and rewrote it even as the movie was being shot. Some of the most iconic images from the film come from the mind of that genius satirist. <br /></span></font></p> <p align="left" class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -4.5pt; line-height: 200%;"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">The authors offer such knowledgeable insight into McQueen¡¯s less-successful films that I <span> </span>now have an urge to view. For instance, <em>Nevada Smith</em>, the prequel to 1964¡¯s hit <em>The Carpetbaggers</em>. Critics dismissed this Henry Hathaway-directed western in 1966 and I believed the criticism of it being below-par. And since leading lady Suzanne Pleshette is one of my least favorites from the Sixties, I really had no desire to sit through it despite my admiration for McQueen. However, the authors create a convincing case for giving it a try, from the beautiful vistas that fill the wide-screen, to the expert way Hathaway juggles character development and action, to Pleshette¡¯s character being not the typical love interest. Not to mention the fact that McQueen is shirtless throughout a lot of the movie, though they concede that it is a stretch to believe the actor, who was in his mid-thirties at the time, as a teenage half-Indian vowing revenge on the varmints that tortured and killed his parents. However, they conclude that McQueen triumphs over this and his performance ¡°engages the viewer emotionally.¡±</span></font></p> <p align="left" class="MsoNormal" style="margin-right: -4.5pt; line-height: 200%;"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-family: &quot;Verdana&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;">I highly recommend <strong><em>Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films</em></strong> by Andrew Antonaides and Mike Siegel to fans of the superstar and to Sixties/Seventies film enthusiasts. The authors do a superlative job from their perceptive prose to the magnificent visuals selected to accompany each chapter. A bit pricey you may say at $69 (cheaper on Amazon.com), but this spectacularly produced book is more than worth it.</span></font></p> <p><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1854432532/?tag=cinemaretroco-20">Click here</a> to order from Amazon and save $26!&#160;</strong></font><font size="2"> </font></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1854432532/cinemaretro-21">Click here </a>to order discounted from Amazon UK</strong><br /></p> Thu, 22 Dec 2011 00:24:48 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/6424-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ BOOK NEWS: "DUELING HARLOWS: RACE TO THE SILVER SCREEN" BY TOM LISANTI NOW AVAILABLE https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/6332-BOOK-NEWS-DUELING-HARLOWS-RACE-TO-THE-SILVER-SCREEN-BY-TOM-LISANTI-NOW-AVAILABLE.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/6332-BOOK-NEWS-DUELING-HARLOWS-RACE-TO-THE-SILVER-SCREEN-BY-TOM-LISANTI-NOW-AVAILABLE.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=6332 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=6332 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p> </p> <p><!-- s9ymdb:5383 --><img width="290" height="448" src="/fbe/uploads/duelingharlows.jpg" class="serendipity_image_center" /> </p> <p>Cinema Retro columnist Tom Lisanti's new book <em>Dueling Harlows: Race to the Silver Screen </em>has just been released. Here is the press release: <br /></p> <div><strong><em>Dueling Harlows: Race to the Silver Screen</em> is the fascinating backstory of the competition to get two rival film biographies both titled <em>Harlow</em> into theaters first that quickly turned into one of the nastiest, dirtiest feuds that Hollywood ever witnessed</strong></div> <p>In 1965, in a rare occurrence not seen before or since, two motion pictures with the same title about the same subject opened within weeks of each other.</p> <p>Carol Lynley was Jean Harlow in Bill Sargent¡¯s <em>Harlow</em> a quickie B&amp;W independent production filmed in Electronovision. Carroll Baker was Jean Harlow in Joseph E. Levine¡¯s <em>Harlow</em> a big budget color extravaganza from Paramount Pictures. Both endeavored to tell the story of the legendary thirties blonde bombshell¡¯s passionate love life and her meteoric rise from bit player to super star before her death at the young age of twenty-six.&#160;</p> <p><em>Dueling Harlows </em>recounts the struggle it took to get these rival movie biographies into theaters first considering the almost daily war-of-words between the movies¡¯ showman producers, which almost escalated into fisticuffs at the 1965 Academy Awards ceremony; the casting problems each faced; the poor screenplays, which hampered the productions; the hurried pace to complete filming causing on-set frustration; and the law suits that followed in the aftermath. Both movies were failures at the time but have camp appeal today.</p> <p><em>Dueling Harlows </em>(with 18 photos) contains new interviews from people who worked on the movies including actors Carol Lynley, Michael Dante, and Aron Kincaid; assistant directors Richard C. Bennett and Tim Zinnemann; casting director Marvin Paige; plus film historian Robert Osborne and producer David Permut. Also included are vintage comments from Joseph Levine, Bill Sargent, Carroll Baker, Ginger Rogers, Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., Michael Connors, and many more.</p> <p> Tom Lisanti an award-winning author of seven books about Sixties Hollywood. Visit his web site <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sixtiessinema.com/">www.sixtiessinema.com</a>. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1456315854/?tag=cinemaretroco-20">CLICK HERE</a> TO ORDER FROM AMAZON</strong> </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0061D5MJ4/?tag=cinemaretroco-20">CLICK HERE</a> TO ORDER KINDLE EDITION FROM AMAZON</strong><br /></p> <p> </p> Sun, 06 Nov 2011 10:58:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/6332-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ TOM LISANTI: GONNA HAVE A "SKI PARTY" https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/2175-TOM-LISANTI-GONNA-HAVE-A-SKI-PARTY.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/2175-TOM-LISANTI-GONNA-HAVE-A-SKI-PARTY.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=2175 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=2175 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><img width="350" height="541" style="border: 0px none; padding-left: 5px; padding-right: 5px;" src="/fbe/uploads/skiparty1.jpg" /><br /><o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p><strong>RETRO-ACTIVE: THE BEST FROM THE CINEMA RETRO ARCHIVES</strong> <br /></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Frankie Avalon (Todd Armstrong/ Jane), Dwayne Hickman (Craig Gamble/ Nora), Deborah Walley (Linda Hughes), Yvonne Craig (Barbara Norris), Robert Q. Lewis (Donald Pevney), Bobbi Shaw (Nita), Aron Kincaid (Freddie Carter), The Hondells (Themselves) Steve Rogers (Gene), Patti Chandler (Janet), Mike Nader (Bobby), Salli Sachse (Indian), John Boyer (Ski Boy), Mikki Jamison (Vicki), Mickey Dora (Mickey), Bill Sampson (Arthur), Mary Hughes, Luree Holmes (Ski Girls), Sigi Engl (Ski Instructor). Uncredited: Christopher Riordan, Ronnie Dayton, Jo Collins, Paul Gleason, and Annette Funicello (Prof. Roberts). Guest Stars: James Brown and the Famous Flames, and Lesley Gore.<o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">I thought I'd end my Top 5 Sixties Beach Party movies with a cold treat for these hot summer days. A few films (i.e. <em>Get Yourself a College Girl, Winter a-Go-Go, Wild Wild Winter</em>) switched the locale from the warm <st1:state w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">California</st1:place></st1:state> seashore to the chilly mountaintop ski slopes. The best of the crop for me was <em>Ski Party</em> (1965).</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Frankie Avalon and Dwayne Hickman play two average college guys, who are losers when it comes to the ladies, so they masquerade as English lasses on a ski trip to discover why their chicks Deborah Walley and Yvonne Craig dig suave ladies man Aron Kincaid and what they really want in a guy. Complications ensue when the pompous Kincaid falls in love with Hickman's female incarnation. Meanwhile, when not romping around in drag, Avalon tries to make Walley jealous by flirting with Swedish bombshell Bobbi Shaw. The first half of the picture unfolds quite briskly with excellent musical numbers performed by Avalon, James Brown, and Lesley Gore though the second half bogs down a bit with a ludicrous ski jump contest and an overlong chase sequence, standard for these AIP musical comedies. <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><em>Ski Party</em> stands out from the rest of the AIP beach-party movies not only because of the change in locale but because of the superior production values. Credit must go to producer Gene Corman and his crew. The film is exquisitely filmed on location with some awesome ski shots. Alan Rafkin also does a first-rate job of directing and keeps the action moving. He brings some originality to the musical numbers as well. Having Frankie Avalon, Deborah Walley, Dwayne Hickman, and Yvonne Craig sing &quot;Painting the Town&quot; while on a sunlit sleigh ride helps elevate the song with the beautiful shots of the foursome traveling through the snow-covered back roads. ¡°Lots Lots More&quot; would just have been a standard song warbled by Frankie Avalon with twistin¡¯ beach babes dancing beside him if it were not for Rafkin¡¯s unusual camera angles capturing the curvy features of Walley, Patti Chandler, Mikki Jamison, and Jo Collins.<o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The musical performances by the guest stars are the standouts of any AIP beach movie. Here it is no exception. Lesley Gore sings the catchy &quot;Sunshine, Lollipops, and Rainbows&quot; on the bus ride to <st1:place w:st="on">Sun Valley</st1:place>. Following the release of <em>Ski Party</em>, the song became a hit and peaked at No. 13 on the Billboard charts. The Hondells turn up on the beach and rock on &quot;The Gasser&quot; and the title song. Finally, the appearance of James Brown and the Flames who come in out of the snow to perform their Top 10 record &quot;I Got You (I Feel Good)&quot; is truly one of the greatest musical moments in beach movie history.<o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><img width="450" height="330" style="border: 0px none; padding-left: 5px; padding-right: 5px;" src="/fbe/uploads/skipartyaronkincaid.jpg" /></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Frankie Avalon and Dwayne Hickman are well paired as the wisecracking losers-in-love Todd and Craig and are very believable and amusing as the peppery English lasses, Jane and Nora. As the objects of their devotion, Deborah Walley and Yvonne Craig are only okay but they look stunning in Technicolor making it perfetly plausible to the audience why the boys would go to so much trouble to win them over. Bobbi Shaw is engaging as a sexy Swede who decides she prefers love, American style. It is nice to see AIP contract players Patti Chandler and Salli Sachse given more to do here than in the Beach Party movies. They along with Luree Holmes, Mikki Jamison, and Playboy Playmate Jo Collins look very good in their bathing suits or tight-fitting ski clothes. For beefcake watchers, there¡¯s lean boyish-looking Mike Nader and handsome, chiseled Steve Rogers. But it is the smarmy charm of Aron Kincaid (pictured above surrounded by a bevy of beauties) as the pompous Freddie who flips for a guy in drag who steals the movie. Usually clad in dark sweaters and turtlenecks (which were a perfect contrast to his blonde hair and fair features), Kincaid is striking looking and awes every girl on screen and every girl in the audience (not to mention a boy or two).<o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><em>Ski Party</em> is available on DVD and I heartily recommend it!<o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">-Tom Lisanti/<a href="http://www.sixtiescinema.com">www.sixtiescinema.com</a><o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <o:p /></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p><a href="http://astore.amazon.com/cinemaretro-20/detail/B00008973I/105-5401648-6737220"> Click here</a> to order the DVD from Amazon Tue, 30 Aug 2011 23:09:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/2175-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ TOM LISANTI: A TRIBUTE TO ARON KINCAID https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/5339-TOM-LISANTI-A-TRIBUTE-TO-ARON-KINCAID.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/5339-TOM-LISANTI-A-TRIBUTE-TO-ARON-KINCAID.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=5339 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5339 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p><img class="serendipity_image_center" src="/fbe/uploads/ARONKINCAID.jpg" width="242" height="320" /></p> <p>Cinema Retro columnist Tom Lisanti pays tribute to his friend, actor Aron Kincaid, who starred in such cult movies as <em>The Girls on the Beach</em>, <em>Beach Ball</em>, <em>Ski Party </em>and&#160;<em>The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini. </em>Kincaid died earlier this week. <a href="http://sixtiescinema.com/2011/01/08/aron-kincaid-surf-no-more/">Click here</a> to link to Tom's tribute at his Sixties Cinema web site. </p> Sun, 09 Jan 2011 18:28:02 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/5339-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ JILL HAWORTH: HER LIFE WAS A CABARET, OLD CHUM https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/5332-JILL-HAWORTH-HER-LIFE-WAS-A-CABARET,-OLD-CHUM.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/5332-JILL-HAWORTH-HER-LIFE-WAS-A-CABARET,-OLD-CHUM.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=5332 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5332 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma"><strong>&#160;</p> <div style="WIDTH: 198px" class="serendipity_imageComment_center"> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_img"><img class="serendipity_image_center" src="/fbe/uploads/haworth.jpg" width="198" height="255" /></div> <div class="serendipity_imageComment_txt">Haworth as Sally Bowles in the Broadway production of Cabaret</div></div> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"></strong></span>&#160;</p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma"><strong>By Tom Lisanti</strong></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">Over the past year, a number of 60s personalities have died, but the one that has most saddened me is <strong>Jill Haworth</strong> who died in her sleep earlier this week. She was one of my most favorite interviews, as she graciously invited me into her home in 1999. She was just so saucy and honest, holding nothing back. What makes it even sadder for me is that I am reading the new entertaining Sal Mineo bio by Michael Gregg Machaud and Jill is quoted extensively throughout as she had a long romance with the actor.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">Petite blonde Jill Haworth made three movies while under personal contract to Otto Preminger--<em>Exodus</em> (where she received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Female Newcomer), <em>The Cardinal</em>, <em>In Harm's Way</em>--before going freelance. After starring in the British horror movie <em>It!</em> she landed the role of Sally Bowles on Broadway in <em>Cabaret</em>. The musical was a huge hit and Jill remained in the role for 2 1/2 years.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">Surprisingly, when she returned to Hollywood in 1969 all she could get were TV guest spots and horror films, theatrical and made-for-TV, including one that gave me the creeps as a kid, <em>Home for the Holidays</em>. Though Jill never stepped on a Broadway stage again, she did do regional theater during the late 70s and 80s and then concentrated solely on voice over work. She did one last movie <em>Mergers &amp; Acquisitions</em> in 2000 playing a loopy ex-hippie mother of two competing sons. She stole the movie.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">Below are some of Jill's sassiest comments to me:<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">When asked what she thought of John Wayne from <em>In Harm's Way</em>.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">"He was the meanest, nastiest man with the worst attitude I ever worked with."<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">Asked why she stayed in <em>Cabaret</em> so long, she jokingly replied:<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">"Just to spite Walter Kerr." (Who in his <em>NY Times </em>review said "the musical's one wrong note is Jill Haworth whose worth no more to the show than her weight in mascara.")<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">When asked if she ever had a chance to play Sally in the film version of <em>Cabaret</em>, she said:<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">"No, they always wanted Liza Minelli for the movie. She's still doing the movie!"<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">When <em>Cabaret</em> was revived on Broadway in 2000 with Natasha Richardson and Alan Cummings, Jill was miffed that she was not invited to the opening. When I said "maybe they couldn't find you", she snapped, "I have only been living in the same apartment since 1966!"<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">Jill never let her stardom go to her head. She was in awe of her Sutton Place neighbor Greta Garbo who walked her dog almost the same time Jill would walk hers. But Jill was too shy to ever say anything. After <em>Cabaret</em> opened, she passed the reclusive star who said, "Good morning Miss Haworth" to which Jill replied, "Good morning Miss Garbo." Jill told me that was worth more to her than anything.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 16.2pt; BACKGROUND: white" class="MsoNormal"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; COLOR: #2a2a2a; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma">Finally, I received one of the nicest compliments from her after my book <strong>Fantasy Femmes of Sixties Cinema </strong>(now available in soft cover at <a href="http://www.sixtiescinema.com/" target="_blank"><span style="COLOR: #0066cc; TEXT-DECORATION: none; mso-bidi-font-size: 11.0pt; text-underline: none">www.sixtiescinema.com</span></a>) was released. She called to thank me for including her and told me that of all the interviews she had given, the piece I wrote really sounded like her and she appreciated that. Farewell dear Jill.</span></p> Sat, 08 Jan 2011 12:00:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/5332-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ CATCHING UP WITH SALLI SACHSE...YEARS AFTER THE BEACH PARTY ENDED https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/4288-CATCHING-UP-WITH-SALLI-SACHSE...YEARS-AFTER-THE-BEACH-PARTY-ENDED.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/4288-CATCHING-UP-WITH-SALLI-SACHSE...YEARS-AFTER-THE-BEACH-PARTY-ENDED.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=4288 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=4288 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <div class="serendipity_imageComment_center" style="width: 458px;"><div class="serendipity_imageComment_img"><img height="586" width="458" src="/fbe/uploads/SALLISKIPARTY.jpg" /></div><div class="serendipity_imageComment_txt">Salli in Ski Party</div></div> <br />by Tom Lisanti <br /> <br />I interviewed former 60s starlet Salli Sachse about 12 years ago for my first book <i>Fantasy Femmes of Sixties Cinema</i>.? Her name may not be familiar, but to fans of American International Pictures¡¯ series of beach movies her face is easily recognizable.? With her waist-long honey brown hair and adorable smile, Salli, literally plucked off the beach in San Diego, appeared in almost every beach party film beginning with <i>Muscle Beach Party</i> (1964) through <i>The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini</i> (1966) and everything else in between including <i>Bikini Beach </i>(1964),<i> Beach Blanket Bingo</i> (1965) and <i>Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine</i> (1965).? <br /> <br />Recalling her time with Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, Salli remarked, &quot;Frankie and Annette were very easy going and a pleasure to work with but they weren¡¯t real beach people.? Frankie was raised in Philadelphia so I don¡¯t think he ever saw a surfboard in his life!? And Annette refused to wear a bikini.? She would only wear a one-piece but I think that had something to do with her contract with Walt Disney.? Annette was such a straight girl¡ªa good Italian Catholic.? Because we grew up on the beach, a lot of us thought we were so cool compared to Frankie and Annette.? I remember that on one movie we were filming some beach scenes late in the afternoon.? It was really chilly and we were fighting the light.? Wrapped in terry cloth robes, a group of us huddled together to keep warm.? Carl the prop man handed us a bottle of brandy.? We were surprised when Annette took a couple of swigs.? She got a bit tipsy and was clowning around.? It was the only time I ever saw her let herself go wild.¡±<br /> <br />When the beach films became passe during the turbulent late sixties, Salli graduated to playing a drag strip groupie in <i>Fireball 500</i> (1966) to a biker chick in <i>Devil¡¯s Angels</i> (1967) to her most famous role as the LSD freak-out girl opposite Peter Fonda in <i>The Trip</i> (1967) to playing a hippie paramour of rock star Christopher Jones in <i>Wild in the Streets</i> (1968). Unfortunately, along the way there was heartbreak when her husband Peter Sachse tragically died in a plane crash in 1966 while Salli was in Hong Kong filming <i>The Million Eyes of Su-Muru</i>.<br /> <br />Salli chucked her movie career in 1969 to concentrate on modeling then photography then studying art in Europe during the seventies.? Returning to the U.S., she earned a Masters in Psychology and became a counselor for &quot;at risk&quot; teens. <br /> <br />In August 2006 Salli was reunited with beach party regulars the late Mary Hughes, Patti Chandler, and Linda Opie for a photo shoot celebrating surf culture in the 1950s and 1960s for <i>Vanity Fai</i>r. Below is a photo taken by Salli's friend while visiting the shoot. Pictured are Mary, Salli, Patti and Linda.? <br /> <br /><p align="center"><img height="300" width="400" src="/fbe/uploads/salli.jpg" style="border: 0px none ; padding-left: 5px; padding-right: 5px;" /></p><p>Today Salli Sachse has a new<a href="http://www.sallisachsefineart.com/"> web site</a><span style="text-decoration: underline;"> </span>where fans can peruse pictures of Salli from her Hollywood and modeling days or purchase her beautiful art work. And she is currently working on her memoir, which should prove to be a very interesting read. </p><p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0786408685/?tag=cinemaretroco-20">Click here</a> to order <i>Fantasy Femmes of 60s Cinema </i>from Amazon</p><p>Visit Tom Lisanti's retro web site <a href="http://www.sixtiescinema.com" target="_blank">www.sixtiescinema.com</a></p> Thu, 11 Feb 2010 02:28:18 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/4288-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ NEW BOOK ARGUES TO REOPEN NATALIE WOOD DEATH CASE https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/3787-NEW-BOOK-ARGUES-TO-REOPEN-NATALIE-WOOD-DEATH-CASE.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/3787-NEW-BOOK-ARGUES-TO-REOPEN-NATALIE-WOOD-DEATH-CASE.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=3787 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=3787 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <br /><div>?</div> <div><img height="416" width="344" style="border: 0px none ; padding-left: 5px; padding-right: 5px;" src="/fbe/uploads/NATALIEWOOD.jpg" /></div><div></div><div></div><div>By Tom Lisanti </div><div></div><div>Twenty-eight years ago actress Natalie Wood drowned off the coast of Catalina when purportedly slipping off her yacht Splendour while trying to get into or trying to secure a dinghy after a fight with her husband Robert Wagner.? After what the public presumed was a thorough investigation, the police have long closed the case after the LA coroner ruled it an accidental drowning. However, in the new book <em>Goodbye Natalie, Goodbye Splendour</em>, co-written by the ship's skipper, new allegations are brought to life including shoddy police work leaving many unanswered questions.</div> <div>?</div> <div>Natalie's sister Lana Wood (best known to?movie fans?as &quot;Plenty O'Toole&quot; in the James Bond adventure <em>Diamond Are Forever</em>) has joined the authors in demanding that the case be reopened. <a href="http://www.prweb.com/releases/2009/09/prweb2939824.htm">Click here</a> for more.</div><div><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1597776394/?tag=cinemaretroco-20">Click here</a> to order the book from Amazon</div> <div>?</div> <div>Visit Tom Lisanti's web site at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sixtiescinema.com/">www.sixtiescinema.com</a></div><div> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sixtiescinema.com"></a></div> <div>?</div> Thu, 15 Oct 2009 23:36:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/3787-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ BYE BYE BIRDIE! HELLO, LADA! https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/3720-BYE-BYE-BIRDIE!-HELLO,-LADA!.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/3720-BYE-BYE-BIRDIE!-HELLO,-LADA!.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=3720 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=3720 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) . <div style="width: 355px;" class="serendipity_imageComment_center"><div class="serendipity_imageComment_img"><img height="479" width="355" src="/fbe/uploads/ladabirdie.jpg" /></div><div class="serendipity_imageComment_txt">With Paul Lynde on the set of Bye Bye Birdie</div></div> <link href="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_filelist.xml" rel="File-List" /><link href="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_themedata.thmx" rel="themeData" /><link href="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_colorschememapping.xml" rel="colorSchemeMapping" /><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> 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mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} </style> <![endif]--> <p style="text-align: justify; line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%;">If you came of age during the Sixties, you may well remember the name Lada Edmund, Jr.? who was one of the original gyrating, mini-skirted go-go girls who danced in a cage on NBC-TV¡¯s music program, <i>Hullabaloo</i> 1965-66.? Similar to ABC¡¯s <i>Shindig</i>, <i>Hullabaloo</i> featured a different celebrity host each week to introduce some of the most popular musical performers of the day.? However, the show received most of its press not for the rock groups or vocalists that guest starred but for Lada and fellow dancers who bumped, grinded and twisted their way into the homes of teenagers every week.? So popular was she that she landed on the cover of <i>TV Guide</i> magazine.<o:p /></span></font></p> <p style="text-align: justify; line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%;">Before she found TV fame, Lada began her career dancing on Broadway. She was one of the original dancers in the 1960 Tony Award winning musical <i>Bye Bye Birdie</i> with Dick Van Dyke, Chita Rivera and Paul Lynde. When rock star Conrad Birdie is drafted, his manager randomly selects high schooler Kim MacAfee from Sweet Apple, Ohio for Conrad to give his final goodbye kiss to on <i>The Ed Sullivan Show </i>before he goes off to the military. Lada played Penelope Ann, one of Kim¡¯s friends and one of the many hysterical fans of the singing idol.? With the first Broadway revival of <i>Bye Bye Birdie</i> starring John Stamos and Gina Gershon scheduled to open in October, Lada has been invited to return to Sweet Apple, Ohio as a special guest and will be visiting backstage soon.<o:p /></span></font></p> <p style="text-align: justify; line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%;">Besides dancing on stage (including productions of <i>West Side Story</i> and <i>Promises, Promises</i>) and TV, Lada shimmied across the big screen in the beach flick <i>For Those Who Think Young</i> (1964) starring James Darren, Pamela Tiffin and Nancy Sinatra.? She then went dramatic in the moonshine movie <i>The Devil¡¯s 8</i> (1968) and the coming-of-age drama <i>Out of It</i> (1969) starring Jon Voight in his first starring role, though it was released after he found fame in <i>Midnight Cowboy</i>. During the Seventies, she became a?stuntwoman?in Hollywood?and?performed death defying?feats in films?including <i>Smokey and the Bandit</i> (1977) starring Burt Reynolds and Sally Field<i>,</i> and?classic TV shows such as <i>Charlie's Angels </i>and<i> Starsky and Hutch.</i>?<o:p /></span></font></p> <p style="line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%;"></span></font></p><p style="line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal" /><div class="serendipity_imageComment_center" style="width: 564px;"><div class="serendipity_imageComment_img"><img height="306" width="564" src="/fbe/uploads/LADAOUTOFIT.jpg" /></div><div class="serendipity_imageComment_txt">With Jon Voight in Out of It</div></div><p /><p style="line-height: 200%;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 200%;">Out of the spotlight for years working as a personal trainer in New Jersey (I tried to locate her for my <i>Glamour Girls of Sixties Hollywood</i> book without any luck), Lada (now known as Lada St. Edmund) has re-surfaced and has launched a comeback.? She is available for interviews through her publicist Walter Newkirk @ <u><a title="mailto:newkirkpr@aol.com" href="mailto:newkirkpr@aol.com"><span style="color: windowtext;">newkirkpr@aol.com</span></a>.</u>?<o:p /></span></font></p> <p style="line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Tom Lisanti has co-written with former 60s actress Gail Gerber her memoir <i>Trippin¡¯ with Terry Southern: What I Think I Remember</i>. Visit his website <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sixtiescinema.com/"><span style="color: purple;">www.sixtiescinema.com</span></a> for more information.<o:p /></span></font></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt;">?<o:p /></span></font></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" face="verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 115%;"><o:p>?</o:p></span></font></p> Sat, 19 Sep 2009 05:35:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/3720-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ RARE SCREENINGS OF "THE VELVET VAMPIRE" IN HOLLYWOOD AUGUST 14-16 https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/3574-RARE-SCREENINGS-OF-THE-VELVET-VAMPIRE-IN-HOLLYWOOD-AUGUST-14-16.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/3574-RARE-SCREENINGS-OF-THE-VELVET-VAMPIRE-IN-HOLLYWOOD-AUGUST-14-16.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=3574 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=3574 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p /><p><img height="426" width="288" style="border: 0px none ; padding-left: 5px; padding-right: 5px;" src="/fbe/uploads/VELVETVAMPIRE.jpeg" /></p> <div><b>She Wants to Suck Your Blood</b></div> <div>by Tom Lisanti</div> <div>?</div> <div>With the success of the <em>Twilight</em> books and movies and the hit HBO series <em>True Blood</em>, vampires are all the rage these days.? Former '60s actress, the still beautiful Celeste Yarnall, will find time from promoting her new book <em>Holistic Cat Care</em> to be a special guest star at this year's <a href="http://www.vampire-con.com/slash/"><u>Vampire's Con</u> </a>from August 14-16th in Hollywood where they will screen her cult horror movie <em>The Velvet Vampire</em> (1971).? According to Celeste, the only known master print is part of Quentin Tarantino's private collection and he is graciously lending it for the occasion. Below Celeste remembers the making of the movie.</div> <div>?</div> <div>In 1971's<em> The Velvet Vampire</em>? (whose great tag line proclaimed, &quot;She¡¯s waiting to love you--to death!&quot;) Celeste plays?the?mysterious beauty?Diana who after meeting married couple Susan and Lee Ritter (Sherry Miles and Michael Blodgett) at an art gallery lures them into staying the weekend at her Mojave Desert home.? Soon both husband and wife find themselves sexually drawn to their mysterious host who suffers from a rare blood disease.? Unlike vampires of lore, Diana was able to journey out into the sunlight as long as she is covered up.? In the course of twenty-four hours, Diana feasts on a mechanic, his girlfriend, and a servant.? After making love with Diana, Lee wants to depart but Susan is fascinated with the charming Diana and wants to stay.? Their delay in leaving costs Lee his life while Diana meets her gruesome end at the hands of a cult hippie gang. &quot;I dyed my hair black for this role,&quot; says Celeste.? &quot;Though the part was a bit corny, I got into playing a vampire.? The film had an interesting script by Charles S. Swartz, which explained Diana¡¯s condition very well.? This was one of the first films released by Roger Corman¡¯s new production company [New World] and was more original than some of Roger¡¯s other films, which were rip-offs of other movies.? I became good friends with Roger and have a lot of respect for his talent.&quot;</div> <div>?</div> <div>Celeste accepted the role of Diana despite the nude scenes (&quot;I had my daughter Cami to support.&quot;) after turning down previous parts that required nudity including a role in <em>Winning</em> with Paul Newman.? &quot;Though I was only semi-nude, it still bothered me, Charles Swartz also produced the film and his wife Stephanie Rothman directed it.? They both were very nice and one of the ways that they persuaded me into doing the nude scene with Michael Blodgett was by making it an absolutely closed set.? After it was lit, everyone left except the cinematographer, Stephanie, and her husband.? The cinematographer¡¯s name was Daniel Lacambre and he was brilliant.? He lit and shot the film beautifully.&quot;</div> <div>?</div> <br /><a href="/fbe/index.php?/archives/3574-RARE-SCREENINGS-OF-THE-VELVET-VAMPIRE-IN-HOLLYWOOD-AUGUST-14-16.html#extended">Continue reading "RARE SCREENINGS OF &quot;THE VELVET VAMPIRE&quot; IN HOLLYWOOD AUGUST 14-16"</a> Tue, 11 Aug 2009 16:00:35 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/3574-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ TOM LISANTI PAYS TRIBUTE TO ACTOR DON EDMONDS https://www.google.com//fbe/index.php?/archives/3485-TOM-LISANTI-PAYS-TRIBUTE-TO-ACTOR-DON-EDMONDS.html Tom Lisanti /fbe/index.php?/archives/3485-TOM-LISANTI-PAYS-TRIBUTE-TO-ACTOR-DON-EDMONDS.html#comments /fbe/wfwcomment.php?cid=3485 0 /fbe/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=3485 nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro) <p><img height="394" width="400" src="/fbe/uploads/Don_Edmonds.jpg" style="border: 0px none ; padding-left: 5px; padding-right: 5px;" /></p><p>By Tom Lisanti</p> <div>Amongst the hoopla surrounding the recent passing of Michael Jackson, Farrah Fawcett, Ed McMahon, Karl Malden,and a few others, one death sadly slipped under the radar.? Actor Don Edmonds died on May 29, 2009 from cancer.? I interviewed him for my book, <em>Hollywood Surf and Beach Movies: The First Wave, 1959-1969</em>.? He was a great guy and we stayed in email contact for awhile.? I had the pleasure to finally meet him in person at a Chiller Convention in New Jersey.? Don was very humble regarding his acting and directing careers and enjoyed talking with fans.? Below is my tribute to him from the book:</div> <div>?</div> <div>Actor Don Edmonds was born in Kansas City, Missouri.? His father relocated the family to Long Beach, California in the thirties and got work as a timekeeper at the shipyards.? Soon the elder Edmond¡¯s entrepreneurial son began offering to shine shoes for military men at the Pike an amusement park in Long Beach earning more money than his father.? The cute-looking youngster also had a talent for singing and appeared in local USO shows singing &quot;Mammy&quot; in black face.? </div> <div>?</div> <div>As a teenager Edmonds spent his time hanging out on the beach.? &quot;The first surfboard I ever saw was in 1950 when my friend Terry McGelrand who was this wild guy brought one back from Hawaii.? This board must have been fifty feet long and it had no fin on it.? We loaded it up on his Woodie and took it down to the beach.? We had always been belly floppers before that.? He took it out into the water and stood up on it.? We gasped, ¡®Whoa, check that out!¡¯&quot;</div> <div>?</div> <div>¡°We all began surfing after that,&quot; continues Don.? &quot;A couple of legends came from our group.? Hobie Alter had this shack out there where he was experimenting with different kinds of weights and woods.? He began designing surfboards.? Later he was famous for the Hobie Cat.? The other guy who I really grew up with was about three or four years younger than us and he'd plead, ¡®Can I hang around with you guys?¡¯? We'd say, ¡®No, go away!? We're going to look for girls.¡¯? He was always the kid we'd chase away.? His name was Bruce Brown who went on to make <em>The Endless Summer</em>.&quot;</div> <div>?</div> <div>After graduating high school, Don Edmonds joined the service and became a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne.? While stationed at Fort Bragg in North Carolina he joined the Spielhaus Players and appeared in works by such renowned playwrights as Tennessee Williams and William Inge.? Returning to Long Beach, the lanky sandy-blonde hair surfer boy was cast in several local theatrical productions before joining the Estelle Harmon Actor¡¯s Workshop where his classmates included BarBara Luna, Bill Bixby, Millie Perkins and Ty Hardin.? From there Edmonds was able to finagle an agent to represent him and began landing work on television most notably in five episodes of <em>Playhouse 90</em>.</div> <div>?</div> <div>While working on <em>Playhouse 90</em>, Edmonds became fascinated with directing.? &quot;I'd sit and just watch the director.? I just knew I wanted to direct.? I never just hung out in my dressing room.? Instead I would come out on the set and observe gentlemen like Ralph Nelson and John Frankenheimer work.? They were young guys back then making their bones too.? This was the only schooling that I had.? I was just so interested in the directing process.&quot;</div> <div>?</div> <br /><a href="/fbe/index.php?/archives/3485-TOM-LISANTI-PAYS-TRIBUTE-TO-ACTOR-DON-EDMONDS.html#extended">Continue reading "TOM LISANTI PAYS TRIBUTE TO ACTOR DON EDMONDS"</a> Tue, 11 Aug 2009 15:37:00 +0000 /fbe/index.php?/archives/3485-guid.html http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/